Wednesday, 8 October 2008

mcclintock means...

Surname: McClintock
Recorded in several forms as shown below, this is a Scottish and now Irish, surname. It originates from the pre 10th century surname Mac Giolla Fhionndaig meaning 'The son of the follower of St Fionndag', now known as St Findan. This name originates from "fionn", meaning fair haired. St. Findan also written as Fintan and Fintoc, was the founder of the monastery of Clonard in Ireland. The McClintocks belong to the county of Argyllshire, where they are recorded particularly in the district of Lorn around Lochaweside. Early examples of the surname recording include Teg M'Gillindak, the author of a poem in the book 'Argyllshire', by the former dean of Lismore. The name is recorded in a wide variety of spellings including M'Ilandick, M'Illandag, M'Illandick, M'Lentick, McLintog, and the more usual McClintock and McLintock. The surname is numerous in the Ulster counties of Antrim and Derry, and as an example on February 16th 1762, a son, James, was born to James McClintock and Eleanor Hamilton, in Antrim, whilst Daniel McClintock, together with their five children, sailed from Londonderry on the ship "Mary-Harrington", on June 2nd 1846, bound for New York. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Duncan Mcgellentak. He was a witness in West Perthshire,and appears in the "Records of the Scottish Highlands", in 1549. This was during the reign of Queen Mary of Scotland, 1542 - 1567. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was sometimes known as the Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.
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